Flatbed vs. Combination Printers

  • The speed that combination printers produce rigid material in register and at an acceptable quality is far lower than their quoted speeds. Read more
  • The market price for graphics printed onto roll stock is generally significantly less than graphics printed onto rigid materials. See example.
  • Combination printers typically are not capable of printing multiple sheets in one print cycle / run, while a true flatbed printer is designed specifically for this function. Learn more.
  • The cost of output on a combination printer for roll work is significantly higher than a dedicated solvent roll printer. See why.
  • Combination units, due to the nature of their design and feed systems, have difficulty consistently handling thin gauge materials and holding print registration. Learn more.
A dedicated flatbed printer is designed to enable the printer to produce multiple prints in a single print cycle/run. A dedicated flatbed printer is designed to enable the printer to produce multiple prints in a single print cycle/run.

Demonstration Proof Point: Before you make an investment in a dedicated flatbed or a combination printer, make sure you:

  • Test rigid materials of varying thicknesses
  • Time the loading and unloading of rigid material
  • Observe how well they print in register
  • Count the steps necessary to achieve register
  • Quantify the change-over procedure between rigid stock of varying dimensions
  • Produce multiple prints of the same image to observe how well the printer maintains register and quality over a long print run.

 


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